A Review of, “The Underestimated Gospel” a Compilation of Edited Sermons from the 2012, “Together for the Gospel” Conference.

I know 2012 was a few years back, but that didn’t stop B&H Books from publishing this work in 2014.  Jonathan Leeman is the General Editor for this compilation of sermons.  He did a great job putting them together in book format.  Here is list of the Pastors whose sermons are featured in this book, David Platt, John Piper, Kevin DeYoung, Matt Chandler, R. Albert Mohler Jr. Thabiti Anyabwile, Mark Dever, C.J. Mahaney, and J. Ligon Duncan III.  With this list of names you would expect to see some good sermons.  I did, and I wasn’t disappointed.  As you can tell from the name of the book, and the conference, the messages focused on the gospel of Jesus, and its power to change everything.  

I don’t want to do the typical critical review here.  It isn’t really that kind of work.  This was sermons, preached to Pastors, for their edification, by other Pastors, at a conference.  It was not a work of fiction, a history book, a “Christian living” book, theology book, or a biography.  Considering that, I would rather just encourage you to read this volume of sermons for your own edification.  You don’t have to be a Pastor to get the message from this book.  Any Christian could pick this up and read it for their benefit.  These men laid out for us the importance of preaching the gospel, and how it applies to every aspect of Christian conversion, security, life, evangelism, and discipleship.  You get a view through a portal into the head and heart of these Pastors as they preach about the gospel.  

I would recommend this book to anyone who is tired of hearing fluff that doesn’t actually change anything, to Pastors who lack authority in their preaching, to Pastors who want to see their flock changed by the word of God.  The worst that can happen is that you would spend a short time reading some very good sermons.  If you are a false teacher, and false convert, the best thing that could happen, is that you could be genuinely saved, and motivated to give up that useless moralism, life enhancement, prosperity, best life now, drivel, you’ve been pushing, and actually preach the gospel of Jesus Christ crucified.  Sorry if that seemed a bit harsh.  I have sat in Churches that don’t preach the gospel.  It gets me riled up now when I think about other poor souls sitting in  a Church having nonsense preached at them.  Seriously, if you are a Pastor, or know a Pastor, get them this book.  It will aid them and encourage them.

You can pick up a copy here at Christianbook.com

You can also watch the entire conference for free on the site.

ISBN: 9781433683909

A Review of the, “Westminster Confession of Faith” as Published by, “The Banner of Truth Trust.”

DSCN4851

Many of you know what a Confession of Faith is.  Many of you are familiar with the Westminster Confession of Faith.  If you are one of the many who is already familiar, bear with me for a moment.  If you are reading this review, and are not familiar with the subject matter, then you are here providentially to learn.  When people speak of a Confession of Faith, they are talking about a Church document that apprises, in detail, the Essential Articles, or Doctrines of the Faith.  You see, before the invention of the internet, mass media, and distribution, people had to read books, and other documents to learn things.  

DSCN4852

I know it seems silly, and antiquated in this day of smartphones, tablets, apps, and e-readers, but nonetheless it is true.  For some of us old  fuddy-duddies, the appeal of the book has not been outshined by modern contenders. Especially when it comes to having a hard copy record that can’t be changed with an internet update.  So we have books with all of their limitations, and assets.  

People would study from a Confession to give themselves a better understanding of what the Church believed.  They would study, so they could teach others.  They would study, so they could defend their beliefs.  We still study for those same reasons.

Many Churches say they don’t have a confession of faith, creeds, or doctrines.  Of course their claim qualifies as all of the above.  It would be humorous if it weren’t so sad.  Perhaps, they have some phobia against a clear statement of faith?  Perhaps, they are afraid that God isn’t powerful enough to call, and keep His own?  Maybe they fear people might be offended by the doctrines of the Faith?  We do know from scripture, “For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”  

If you go to a Church with a, “Statement of Faith” or a, “What We Believe” article on their website, a Confession of Faith is sort of like that, but only more complete. So if you are feeling brave, and intrepid, I suggest you get ahold of your Church’s, confession, manual, or other foundational documentation, and compare it to the Bible.  If it doesn’t match up, you should leave.

The Westminster Confession of Faith is a historic document of the Church.  It came after the Protestant Reformation, during the Puritan era.  The name comes from the Westminster Abbey, where the theologians of the time met, by request of the English Parliament, to provide advice on issues of worship, doctrine, government and discipline of the Church of England.  The results were the Westminster Catechism, Longer and Shorter, as well as the Westminster Confession of Faith.  This edition includes the American revisions, and is used widely by Presbyterian Churches here in America.  

This edition of the Westminster Confession of Faith, is in the Gift Editions Collection, from Banner of Truth.  They are small enough to go in your pocket.  It measures 5.55 x 4 x 0.5 in.  It is covered with a black, synthetic, leather-like, material with some ornamentation on the front cover.  It has a sewn binding, as well as decorative head and tail bands.

DSCN4858

The text is  printed in a 10.5 pt font.  It is large enough text to be very legible.  The paper is pretty heavy as well.  Each sections starts with a Bold title and drop cap.
DSCN4857

These are durable little books, meant to be carried and shared.  There is a very useful Table of Contents in the beginning, to help you quickly find the section you want to look up.  It works great for quick reference when someone asks you a question.  It includes proofs from scripture in each section.  If you’ve ever wanted to understand Reformed theology better, this little book is a great aid.  The Westminster Confession of Faith has become a familiar partner and aid to Christians through the many generations since its penning.  I encourage you to get a copy of this for your edification, and the aid of others you come in contact with.  The best way to effectively share your faith, is to know it first.

Make sure to check out all of the pictures on the flickr page.

ISBN: 9781848711099

A Review of the JOT Bible Life-Notes Journal in Black Genuine Leather.

DSCN4999
Do you study your Bible?  I don’t mean devotional reading.  I mean, do you sit down with your Bible, a journal, Greek/Hebrew resources and some commentaries, to unpack God’s word?  If you are a serious student of God’s word, you’ll love this journal.  Pastors study to prepare for sermons, Teachers study to instruct, Evangelists study to make the gospel known, Apologists study to make reasonable arguments, Christians study to be discipled.  As Christians we all should be studying God’s word.  Out of the available tools we have at our disposal, recording our thoughts on paper is one of the most effective ways of revisiting them.  Considering the above callings, it is very beneficial.  

DSCN5006

As a student, I’m often frustrated with the journals available on the market today.  They don’t open flat.  You always are fighting the cover of the journal.  They are small.  You can’t fit all of your thoughts from the entire Bible in one journal.  You end up with several unmatched journals floating around your house.  It ruins the continuity.  I also find that I lose them.  If you are going to a few different places in your Bible during a lesson, you have to remember which journals you wrote in.  You have to gather them and bring them with you.  The covers are usually flimsy card paper or moleskin.  

I realize some of you might be wondering what the fuss is about.  “Isn’t that why the invented wide margin Bibles?”  Well, yes and no.  Anyone who has used a wide margin Bible has run into the problem of not having ruled lines.  This might not seem like a big problem to those of you who have been blessed with the “spiritual gift” of beautiful handwriting. (just kidding. I know that is not one of the gifts.)  No ruled lines, is a real problem for me.  My notes meander all over the margin, not to mention that there is never enough room for some of the most elementary notables to be notated 🙂  While, wide margins have their place, they don’t fit the bill for some of us.  Space is the next issue with wide margin Bibles.  There is never enough blank space for notes.  You can never seem to get all of what you are thinking down on the paper next to the verses you are meditating on.

I often wonder what will happen to all of my journals?  They are all disorganized, and haphazard.  Will my kids toss them out after I’m gone?  Will they know what is in them?  I want to have my all of my ruminations in one volume, organized, durable, functional, and easily referenced.  On more than a few occasions, I’ve wondered if that was too much to ask.  After talking to several other Christian friends over the years, I found that I wasn’t alone.  We just consigned ourselves to the notion that our notes would forever be a collage of our faith journeys.

DSCN5167

I’m glad to say that someone has finally remedied this malady.  The JOT Bible Life-Notes is the perfect receptacle for your meditations, ruminations, and contemplations.  It matches your Bible in looks and size.  It is a fitting companion to bring to the pulpit with your trusty Bible.  It looks like a Bible, but it isn’t.  

DSCN5021


It matches the Bible book, chapter, and verse.  For every verse of the Bible there are two ruled lines with the verse number next to them, printed on fine, acid free, highly opaque, 42 g.s.m. Bible paper!  I mean what!?  You’ve got to be kidding me!  That is far superior to most paper used in Bible printing, and they have an entire journal made from it, sweeeeeeet!  I don’t know if you can tell from the pictures, but I am a pencil masher.  I tend to push pencils and pens through the page when I write.  If I am writing on thin paper, fogehtaboutit…  I hope you can tell from the pictures that this paper holds up to pencil quite well.  I would recommend pencil, as you can go back and edit notes later on.  We are always learning more, every time we read the Bible so sometimes you have to go back and add things to your notes or fix misunderstood verses.  Pencil erases nicely from this paper without leaving the paper wounded.

DSCN5165

DSCN5166

I did write notes in John 1 in black ink. This section of scripture will always assure me of Christ’s power, and the truth of God’s Word. This is what it looks like when you use ink. Just be sure it is something you aren’t going to change. I will only use pencil for the rest of my notes.

DSCN5170

DSCN5169

The printing of the lines and features of this journal is done in a consistent fashion.  I haven’t noticed any breaks in the lines.  The page edges are gold gilt.

DSCN5032

DSCN5023

DSCN5010

The JOT comes in a heavy duty two piece box that should be retained for storage.  It is seriously built better than most Bible boxes.

DSCN5002

The cover is supposed to be genuine leather.  I can’t place it though.  It seems too nice to be pigskin leather, but it is tougher than other cowhide leather covers.  Regardless, it is flexible and durable.  It is a work of form and function.

DSCN5008

The binding is a smythe-sewn spine in a case bound cover.  The spine of the JOT Bible Life-Notes is ornamented with five raised spine hubs.  The perimeter is stitched.  There is a presentation page in the front that includes a spot for you to write your contact information incase you lose your journal so that the person who finds it can get it back to you.

DSCN5016

DSCN5014

DSCN5007

DSCN5036

DSCN5017

There are three ribbon markers in, black, red, and blue. This thing is pretty much built like a quality Bible, but beefed up for note taking.  Again, to be clear, THIS IS NOT A BIBLE, IT IS A JOURNAL!!!  Don’t buy this thinking it is a Bible.  I know it looks like one, but it isn’t.  

DSCN5037

So just to recap the high points here; durable, useful, all your notes in one place, attractive, helpful, heirloom possibilities, preaching aid, study tool, memoirs from time with God’s word.

To be honest there is only one drawback that comes to mind.  It is a hefty tome, but if you know anything about book design, you’d know there are finite attributes that are interrelated.  When you change one thing it affects the others.  Using thick paper, and giving us room to write, necessitates a larger volume.  It can’t be helped.  I’d much rather have ample room along with function and form than have all form.  This thing is meant for work and does not need to be forgiven for that.  So if you are in the market for a high quality depository for all of your meditations instead of just a smattering of them, this is the journal for you.  Give it a try and recommend it to your friends, I know I am.  Make sure to check out all of the close up pictures I took of this journal on my flickr page here.  You can purchase yours on Amazon.  You can also check out their site here.
ISBN: 9780692396193

A Necessary Book for your Christian Library, Foxe’s Book of Martyrs from Hendrickson’s Classics.

DSCN4714
 
Most of you are familiar with this title. It is an edifying record of several martyrs from the early Church. Every Christian should own a copy of this book, and read it for their growth. We need to know what happened and the culture in which it happened. We need to understand that it could happen again in our own country, and that it is happening now all over the world. If you don’t have a hard copy of this book and only have a digital copy, I suggest you get this one. It is affordable, well done, and printed in the U.S.A.
 
DSCN4719
 
DSCN4721
 
DSCN4716
 
DSCN4715
 
DSCN4720
 
Digital copies are fine, but what happens when tech doesn’t work? What happens if a ruling class decides to issue an electronic update and your devices all rewrite your Christian books? Hard copies, put away in a library are insurance against that. I know, they take up a lot of room, and cost money, and can burn up in a fire, but they are important for archiving valuable information. This book contains content that would help us to act appropriately, in future situations that could be similar or the same. Reading about Christians who were pursued, persecuted, and killed for their faith, should help us understand that their convictions were strong. Stronger than their fear of death. We should all hope that if we, by God’s providence are to be martyred, that He would grant us the grace that these precious ones of His received.

We can read about the Apostles, and men like Polycarp who knew John. Here is an excerpt from the book,
“Polycarp, the venerable bishop of Smyrna, hearing that persons were seeking for him, escaped, but was discovered by a child. After feasting the guards who apprehended him, he desired an hour in prayer, which being allowed, he prayed with such fervency, that his guards repented that they had been instrumental in taking him. He was, however, carried before the proconsul, condemned, and burnt in the market place.
The proconsul then urged him, saying, “Swear, and I will release thee;–reproach Christ.”
Polycarp answered, “Eighty and six years have I served him, and he never once wronged me; how then shall I blaspheme my King, Who hath saved me?” At the stake to which he was only tied, but not nailed as usual, as he assured them he should stand immovable, the flames, on their kindling the fagots, encircled his body, like an arch, without touching him; and the executioner, on seeing this, was ordered to pierce him with a sword, when so great a quantity of blood flowed out as extinguished the fire. But his body, at the instigation of the enemies of the Gospel, especially Jews, was ordered to be consumed in the pile, and the request of his friends, who wished to give it Christian burial, rejected. They nevertheless collected his bones and as much of his remains as possible, and caused them to be decently interred.”

We can also read about men from the Reformation like, John Wickliffe, John Huss, and Martin Luther. What these people did to preserve and spread God’s word, so that we could have it today, should make us appreciate their dedication and spur us on to remain faithful during persecution.

Richard Baxter’s, “The Reformed Pastor” published by, “The Banner of Truth” is just as relevant today as it was in 1651.

richard baxter
Richard Baxter’s, “The Reformed Pastor” published by, “The Banner of Truth” is just as relevant today as it was in 1651.  It is a timeless classic of Christian writing and should be in every Pastor’s library and read by every Christian.  This book was written to address problems Baxter saw with his contemporaries.  He was going to address them with a speech, but fell ill.  Instead, he wrote to them, the words recorded in this book.  Some Pastors were unbelievers, some were, cold intellectuals with great educations, others were passionate, but not qualified to serve as Pastors, yet still others were just as crass and base as the carnal world they wallowed in.  Baxter took them all to task, and not just them, but himself also.

Don’t be mistaken.  This book is not a polemic, but a call to repent and be a loyal and true servant of God.  The work is broken down into three chapters.  Chapter one, “The oversight of ourselves” starts as a check up or a self-diagnostic per se.  Baxter effectively brings to light the necessity of a Pastor being truly regenerated.  Then, he warns Pastors about pitfalls of bad practices, as well encourages them.  Chapter two, “The oversight of the flock” is just that.  Instruction on how to perform the vocation dutifully for the Lord’s service and man’s benefit.  If it weren’t full enough of good applicable information, then comes chapter three, “Application.”  This Chapter is the largest of the book, and encompasses the most directly applicable information for Pastors.  The book in its entirety, convicts, informs, and exhorts.

Some of you might be concerned that this book will be difficult to read due to it being in Modern English. (like the King James)  I want to assure you that it was not a difficult read.  Baxter put much emphasis on being comprehensible.  He encourage the Pastors of the time to employ language and nomenclature that the common man would readily understand.  With that in mind, Baxter wrote.  This book, at times might slow you down, but not excessively or without easy remedy.  

One of the points that grabbed my attention and seemed anachronistic was his preaching against Pastors using their positions as a means to easy and comfortable lives.  It brought to mind many of the Television Pastors living in sixteen thousand square foot palatial homes, while owning fleets of private jets.  I guess bilking the hurting and needy in the name of God has been around for a long time.  That is why it, “seemed” anachronistic when it actually wasn’t.  

There is so much in this book to like.  I found myself underlining and highlighting entire sections.  It is extremely relevant for today, just as I am sure it was for the time in which Baxter wrote.  It reminds me of, “Crazy Love” by Francis Chan, but only for Pastors and from the perspective of a Pastor.  That being said, there are theological notions that Baxter held that I do not affirm.  He held to a sort of middle way when it came to soteriology.  He wasn’t Arminian and he wasn’t Reformed.  While I may not hold to Baxter’s theological convictions, I did thoroughly enjoy this book and will probably read it again and again over the years to come.  You can purchase your copy from the Banner of Truth here, or Amazon here, and finally Christianbook here.

Richard Baxter, “The Reformed Pastor” Chapter 2, Section 2, #13, “With earnest desires and expectations of success.”

13. If you would prosper in your work, be sure to keep up earnest desires and expectations of success. If your hearts be not set on the end of your labors, and you long not to see the conversion and edification of your hearers, and do not study and preach in hope, you are not likely to see much success. As it is a sign of a false, self–seeking heart, that can be content to be still doing, and yet see no fruit of his labor; so I have observed that God seldom blesses any man’s work so much as his, whose heart is set upon the success of it. Let it be the property of a Judas to have more regard to the bag than to his work, and not to care much for what they pretend to care; and to think, if they have their salaries, and the love and commendations of their people, they have enough to satisfy them: but, let all who preach for Christ and men’s salvation, be unsatisfied until they have the thing they preach for. He never had the right ends of a preacher, who is indifferent whether he obtain them, and is not grieved when he misses them, and rejoiced when he can see the desired issue. When a man does only study what to say, and how, with commendation, to spend the hour, and looks no more after it, unless it be to know what people think of his abilities, and thus holds on from year to year, I must needs think that this man does preach for himself, and not for Christ, even when he preaches Christ, how excellency whatever he may seem to do it. No wise or charitable physician is content to be always giving physic, and to see no amendment among his patients, but to have them all die upon his hands. Nor will any wise and honest schoolmaster be content to be still teaching, though his scholars profit not by his instructions, but both of them would rather be weary of the employment.
I know that a faithful minister may have comfort when he wants success; and “though Israel be not gathered, our reward is with the Lord (Isa. 49:5);” and our acceptance is not according to the fruit, but according to our labor: but then, he who longs not for the success of his labors can have none of this comfort, because he was not a faithful laborer. What I say is only for them that are set upon the end, and grieved if they miss it. Nor is this the full comfort that we must desire, but only such a part as may quiet us, though we miss the rest. What if God will accept a physician, though the patient die? He must, notwithstanding that, work in compassion, and long for a better issue, and be sorry if he miss it. For it is not merely our own reward that we labor for, but other men’s salvation. I confess, for my part, I marvel at some ancient reverend men, that have lived twenty, thirty, or forty years with an unprofitable people, among whom they have scarcely been able to discern any fruits of their labors, how they can, with so much patience, continue among them. Were it my case, though I dare not leave the vineyard, nor quit my calling, yet I should suspect that it was God’s will I should go somewhere else, and another come in my place that might be fitter for them; and I should not be easily satisfied to spend my days in such a manner.

A Review of Randy Alcorn’s, “If God is Good: Faith in the Midst of Suffering and Evil” This Should be Required Reading for all Apologetics Classes.

425799

Randy Alcorn’s treatment of the doctrine of theodicy is the, “go to” book on the topic. It is suitable for the neophyte and mature Christian both. If you have ever asked yourself the question, “If God is Good why does He allow bad things to happen to good people?” Or if anyone has ever asked you that question, this book will aid you greatly in giving an answer. I was briefly exposed to this area of Christian theology shortly before providentially finding out about this book. I was blessed by it and I believe you will be to.

Randy writes this book with a Pastor’s heart. He understands that people reading this book are going to be from a wide and varied background with all kinds of questions and hurts. If you have lost a child, been struck with a terminal illness, seen horrific violence, or ever wondered how an omnipotent, benevolent being could allow these things, you can read the explanation that has been carefully crafted and laid out so as to heal and not hurt. I’ve never read such a thorough and gentile explanation that was also so blatantly honest. I’ve read very dry white papers that are accurate, but lack the heart of a Pastor. These works often enrage critics or those who doubt. I’ve also read other books that fail to answer the hard questions about God in light of suffering. The, “cotton candy theology” of men who only want to sell you a book or preach some false life enhancement Christianity only leaves us vulnerable when tribulations occur.

Randy includes real situations, with real people who have been through terrible things. He methodically and caringly explains theodicy so that it will be a comfort and easy to understand as well as explain. If you are an apologist, get this book and study it. They next time you run up against a flaming atheist making the accusation of, “I’d never believe in a god that would allow a baby to be murdered!” You’ll be able to give an answer. If you have a loved one who is going through difficult times, perhaps they have read books from those smiling self-help, guru, false preachers and have not been helped, but instead left doubting, GIVE THEM THIS BOOK! I can’t say enough good things about this book and how useful it is. I give it 5 starts, two thumbs up, and an emphatic Amen.

You can pick up a copy from Christianbook.com or Amazon.com.

ISBN-13: 9781601425799

A Review of, “A Guide to Christian Living” by the Protestant Reformer John Calvin, as Translated by Robert White for The Banner of Truth Trust.

A Review of, “A Guide to Christian Living” by the Protestant Reformer John Calvin, as Translated by Robert White for The Banner of Truth Trust.

DSCN4005

This book is an excerpt of the beginning of, “Book 3, Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion, 1560 French edition.” It is 140 pages long. It has a short introduction providing some background information about John Calvin and his, “Institutes.” It also explains Calvin’s purpose in writing, “Book 3” His purpose is also made clear in this book’s title. At the end of the book are, the endnotes, and indexes of scripture references, as well as subjects. This book is published by The Banner of Truth Trust. It is printed by Versa Press Inc., of East Peoria Illinois USA. The font is a very legible 10.5/13.5 Adobe Caslon Pro typeset. It is available in print, e-pub, and Kindle.

DSCN4006

I found the paper to be very thick and easy to highlight. It is covered in green faux leather. The cover is decorated with a perimeter channel, image of Calvin, and the title stamped in it to resemble tooling.

DSCN4002

The spine looks to be sewn and glued.

DSCN4003

It has the title stamped parallel to the spine, John Calvin under that, and The Banner of Truth’s logo at the foot. Overall I found the book to be well constructed and easy to read.

If you are familiar with the works of Calvin, you’ll recognize this when you start reading it. Unlike many of his Latin works that were translated into English, this translation seems less formal and verbose. Due to that fact it lends itself to devotional reading. It works well for that purpose, and gives you something to ponder while you go about your day. I found myself nodding my head in agreement several times and wondering what other sections of Calvin’s works could be arranged as devotionals. It was very refreshing to read something scriptural in Modern English. As of late, the choices have been dismal.  Most devotionals in Modern English are full of extra-biblical revelations, or pseudo-self-help drivel. People have been feasting on cotton candy theology and as a result are malnutritioned.  Reading something that makes you truly consider what is being communicated is stimulating.  You have to engage your head and your heart, not just one or the other.  People say that Calvin is to dry, but if you read his work, you will see his passion for God come through.

My copy of Spurgeon’s, “Morning and Evening” is a bit too large to carry with me to work. This book is much smaller. I can fit it in my pocket. The paper is very thick and heavy, not like Bible paper at all. Highlighting and underlining works well. I was underlining and highlighting sections to quote on social media later on. This way you don’t have to mark up your nicer complete volume of Calvin’s Institutes.  This little book, unlike many devotionals, is more durable it stands up to being carried about.

I recommend this for personal devotions as well as a gift to the newly born again. I think it will aid them in getting their foundational doctrines in order. It can be purchased directly from The Banner of Truth, or you can purchase it from, Christianbook.com as well as Amazon.com.

To see all the pictures I took visit my flickr page.

A Review of, “The Good, the Bad, and the Grace of God, What Honesty and Pain Taught Us About Faith, Family, and Forgiveness.”

By Jep and Jessica Robertson, with Susy Flory

What can I say? I think the Robertson family is funny. I can’t help liking them. When I saw this book come up for review, I decided to read it, considering how much garbage is put out by Harper Collins. Harper Collins owns Zondervan, Thomas Nelson, and Westbow. Seriously, most of the books coming out of these publishers for Christian book stores are heretical, seeker sensitive, neo-liberal, drivel. That being said, this book was written by baptismal regeneration heretics. You could see them hint around a bit in the text of the book. Their beliefs seem orthodox, until you start understanding their take on baptism and regeneration.

Thankfully this book is not a work on theology. It is about their lives and in that area it was very informative, engaging, and entertaining. I read it very quickly and enjoyed getting to know how simple this couple is. Their unorthodox beliefs about baptismal regeneration aside, they seem like a couple of people who have had very similar struggles to many people you or I would know. Jep struggled with drugs when he was younger. He was molested by an older girl when he was a very young boy. This led to a pornography problem as an adult. Jesse struggled with self-esteem issues, was taken advantage of by an inappropriate older man who was her youth pastor, married him out of pressure, divorced within a year, and shamed. They share about how their relationship started, how their faith in God set their focus on Him instead of their own brokenness, and how they both came to believe in God.
If you’re a fan of the Duck Dynasty show, and would like to know more about the youngest brother, then read this book. It is a quick easy read, that will make you feel like you have known them for their entire lives. Don’t read this book for a theology lesson. The Church of Christ that they belong to needs to renounce baptismal regeneration.

Rachel Held Evans, “Searching for Sunday” is Liberal, Emergent Church, Ecumenical, Drivel at Best.

In my opinion, this is one of the most convincing pieces of evidence against RHE. Unless she is being completely dishonest in her book about her doubts, this book should open everyone’s eyes to the fact that she needs help. She has some knowledge of the Bible and theology, but it doesn’t seem to have changed her thinking or lack of faith in regards to some very serious articles of the Faith. She is one of the most dangerous false teachers of our time. She is leading sinners straight to hell while wishing them well and waving as they perish. If the gospel had truly changed her she would demonstrate repentance of sin and a faith that perseveres. Instead she celebrates sexual sin and feminine rebellion as she continuously vacillates between belief and not-belief.

She expresses how she wants to love people, but it seems she wants to do it her way not God’s. She actually rebels against God in so many ways it leads me to conclude, that after reading her book, she probably is not a Christian, or perhaps a very spiritually immature, confused one. It seems like so many liberals, she has made love her god. “God is love, but love is not God.” The fruit of her lack of faith is the evidence, of which there is plenty in just this book alone, never mind all of her blog articles. She affirms women pastors, Roman Catholicism, horrible ecumenism, feminist rebellion, homosexual marriage, and homosexual pastors. On page 135, in the second paragraph she even refers to a homosexual pastor and HIS husband. “…In Seattle, Pastor Tim and his husband Patrick served up fresh salmon…” On page 184 she writes, “…there are denominations of which I cannot in good conscience be a part because they ban women from the pulpit and gay and lesbian people from the table…” homosexuality is not an orientation it is sexual sin that needs to be repented of.

At the start of each chapter she has a quote from someone or she uses a Bible verse. The people she quotes are either, feminists, Roman Catholics, Episcopalians, leftists, homosexual, or a combination of those errors. She uses them as examples of what she believes are the best of Christianity. This is obviously where she stands. Her book seems to be a polemic against men and orthodoxy, unless of course they are liberal or gay. She has some major hang-ups with men and the Church. Her rebellion is evident on every page. It is very sad to see. It is more sad that others will read this damaging book and be tossed into sin and confusion.

After reading the book all I can gather is that her reason why millennials are leaving the Church is that we are too concerned about God’s word and adhering to it rather than tossing it out and having a big gay love fest. She is insane. The non-stop feminist agenda is sickening. She is a basher of heterosexual, conservative, orthodox people who hides behind her, “love everyone” facade. As testimony to her sloppy ecumenism she quotes her friend on page 185, “…”When you join a church you’re just picking which hot mess is your favorite.” That sounds about right to me…” She even makes the stupid tree analogy about how we are all part of the same tree.  RHD is like your bitter, manipulative, little sister, who has whipped up some false tears, so she can point her finger at orthodox Christians, and falsely accuse them of being bullies, because they love God instead of the world system.

Her biggest flaw is that she does not understand the purpose of the gospel or the Church. She has completely missed it. In all of her self-doubt, self-righteous, ecumenical man bashing, she misses the point. The sinner who hears the gospel and repents and believes is saved by grace. They repent. They no longer think or feel the same about sin in general and their own personal sin. That means that homosexuals who get saved will begin to hate their sexual sin of homosexuality. They might still feel that same sex attraction, but they won’t live the lifestyle. They will leave their gay lovers and become celibate or they will be changed by God and become straight. It is not impossible with God. If porn addicts can get free, if the adulterous can get free, if drug addicts can get free, so can people with SSA. There is no sin too great for God to conquer and leaving people in their sin while telling them they are Christian is giving them a ticket to Hell. It is one of the most hateful, unloving, unchristian, things I can think of to do to someone. The Church is for the worship of God.

Millennials aren’t leaving the Church over, “…politics, sexuality, science, and social justice…” They are leaving the Church because they have never heard the real gospel. They are not saved. They are sinners under the condemnation of sin and are leaving because they have never truly repented and believed the gospel in the first place.
ISBN-13: 978-0718022129
I review for BookLook Bloggers

This book was provided gratis by bookblogger for an honest review.