The Basics of How to Study the Bible.

DSCN2856As a Christian, it is good for us to desire the pure milk of the word. If you are a new believer, or even if you have been a believer for a while, it isn’t uncommon for Christians to have questions about how they should study the Bible. There are many articles out there that give some very generic information on how to study the Bible, and there are yet more that flatly get it wrong. The goal of this article is to be helpful, without being too complicated, or too simple. Hopefully it will be just the right combination for most of you.

If you are indwelt by the Holy Spirit, you are blessed with a teacher who will lead you into truth. (1 John 2:27) This isn’t to say you shouldn’t learn from Christians who came before. The same Holy Spirit who indwelt them, indwells you. He teaches them the same truth, and since they already lived, and learned, we can glean some hard-won understanding from reading their works. Equipped with the Holy Spirit, your next consideration should be prayer. Pray for God to make Himself known to you by the study of His word and the power of His Spirit. Obviously, you’ll need a Bible, and a place to study. It also helps to have some way to take notes, and some reference materials, like a concordance, dictionary, and some commentaries. You can get many of these materials online for free on certain web sites, or as apps for your tablet or smart phone.

The next step is to have a plan, whether it is for a short-term word study, topical study, or long-term in-depth study of the entire Bible. I’m the type of person who reads slowly. I study while I read. Other people who read much faster do a study that is separate from their daily reading. If you are reading along, and not paying close attention you can find yourself many pages into a section with no recollection or understanding of what you just read.

You’ve got your materials, your plan, a place and time set aside to study, and you’ve prayed, now what? Time to consider some hermeneutical ideas before diving in. These are things you’ll have to remember to employ while you study, or you could come up with meanings to the scriptures that God, the author did not intend. It is imperative that we don’t approach the word of God irreverently, or eisegetically. We should come seeking the truth, not to bolster an argument for our own position.

I have two fancy words for you, “exegesis, and eisegesis.” Exegesis is when you read the Bible and allow it to inform your understanding. The meaning of the scriptures, and the intent of the author are brought out of the text through faithful study. Eisegesis is when you come to the text with a preconceived notion and read it into the text. You may have seen some false teachers do this. They will cherry pick a few verses out of context, arrange them in a way that seems to make them say what they want them to say. If you aren’t armed with the truth, you might fall for this trick. This is another good reason to understand how to study the Bible.

While focusing on the hermeneutical concept of exegesis we must also consider who the author is writing to, what language is being used, what idioms of that language are being employed, when the audience lived, where they lived, what their culture was like, what relationship the author had with the audience, what type of literature the writing is,(e.g. poetry, historical narrative, songs, prescriptive, prophetic, apocalyptic, epistles/letters, allegory, and wisdom/proverbial language to name some.) grammatical rules, transmission of the text to man by God, modern applications for the individual Christian, and the Church, and finally context, context, context!

Context is key. The meanings you come to by analyzing a verse must fit with the verses surrounding them, and the sections of scripture that speak to those topics in the rest of the Bible. They must also fit with the entire message of God’s word in toto.

I know all of that sounds daunting, but it really is worth the time, and effort to consider these things when you are studying. Since God as the author intended for us to understand His word, and by His Spirit has made it understandable to us, we can, and should read it in its literal sense most of the time. As you mature in faith, and become more familiar with scriptures, much of those aspects will become self-evident, and you’ll find yourself checking a couple of them to get the point of a difficult passage.

With all of that in mind you can follow along as we examine some small passages of scripture. First let’s examine Genesis 11:31-32, “31Terah took Abram his son, and Lot the son of Haran, his grandson, and Sarai his daughter-in-law, his son Abram’s wife; and they went out together from Ur of the Chaldeans in order to enter the land of Canaan; and they went as far as Haran, and settled there. 32The days of Terah were two hundred and five years; and Terah died in Haran.”

Fortunately for us, modern Bible translations move the words around in the sentence to fit modern English grammar. Otherwise we would need to know the Biblical languages to figure out what is going on. With a simple plain reading of verse 31 we can tell who the object, and subject are, and what the verb is. If you had already read the Bible from the beginning to this point you wouldn’t already know that Moses was the prophet and patriarch whom God used to give us these scriptures, and that the Old testament is mostly ancient Hebrew with a small section in Aramaic. At this point the word of God was passed on verbally and had yet been written down. It wouldn’t be until later in the book of Exodus we would read that Moses was told to compile and write down the first five books of the Bible. This is where some of those resources come in handy that I mentioned earlier. You could use a commentary, and Bible history book, to help you out.

The direct object is, “Terah.” The verb is, “took.” The subject is, “Abram.” From the grammar, and a plain reading of the verse we know that Terah took Abram from Ur to Canaan. We also know that Abram was the son of Terah. We can check this by looking at the genealogy that was in the preceding verses. From those same verses we know that Haran is also a son of Terah, and a brother of Abram. We also know that Lot is Terah’s grandson by Haran, and that Terah took Lot with him, when he took Abram. We know that Sarai was Abram’s wife, and Terah’s daughter-in-law, and that she also went with them. The town, “Haran” as translated in English looks like Abram’s brother’s name, “Haran.” By using a concordance and a Hebrew dictionary we can find out that these two proper names are not the same. Haran the son of Terah and Abram’s brother is spelled, “הָרָן֙” in Hebrew. Whereas the town’s name is, “חָרָ֖ן” Haran, Abram’s brother means, “mountaineer” in Hebrew. It is pronounced, “haw-Rawn” Haran the place means, “crossroads” and is pronounced, “cha-ran.” If we pick up where we left off the scripture says v31b, “;and they went as far as Haran, and settled there.” We know the, “they” refers to the group that was traveling with Terah. We also know they finally stopped at the town, “Haran” and settled there. The literal and plain meaning of the text is what we needed here in this historical narrative. With a little help from grammar, the original language, a concordance, Biblical history book, commentary, and a concordance we have it made. “32 The days of Terah were two hundred and five years; and Terah died in Haran.” The days of who? Terah. What about those days? Were they actually talking about literal days, or were they talking about how long he lived? From our knowledge of the idioms we know that the narrative is about how long he lived, not the actual days of his life. It is a figure of speech. We can see that he lived 205 years. We also read that at the end of those days, Terah died, and that it happened in Haran.

Even though this was only two verses, you can see that it can quickly become quite complicated and involved if you are straining for understanding but worry not! Your mind can do most of this on the fly, and quite quickly. You might not even recognize that you are doing it.

For our next example let’s look at 1 Timothy 5:17-18, “17 The elders who rule well are to be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who work hard at preaching and teaching. 18 For the Scripture says, “YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING,” and “The laborer is worthy of his wages.”” Even with no context we can see what is meant regarding the elders and their keep. This is due to the explanation in the form of a quote from the Old Testament and what follows immediately after. We also have added scriptural context from 1 Corinthians 9:9-14, “9 For it is written in the Law of Moses, “YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING.” God is not concerned about oxen, is He? 10 Or is He speaking altogether for our sake? Yes, for our sake it was written, because the plowman ought to plow in hope, and the thresher to thresh in hope of sharing the crops. 11 If we sowed spiritual things in you, is it too much if we reap material things from you? 12 If others share the right over you, do we not more? Nevertheless, we did not use this right, but we endure all things so that we will cause no hindrance to the gospel of Christ. 13 Do you not know that those who perform sacred services eat the food of the temple, and those who attend regularly to the altar have their share from the altar? 14 So also the Lord directed those who proclaim the gospel to get their living from the gospel.”

You can see how additional context helped to understand the quote from the old Testament in the way that it was intended. After reading the quote from Deuteronomy a person might think that Paul is quoting the passage out of context. If you do think that, you should go read Justin Taylor’s article which quotes some other people’s work, and a couple of commentaries. (Read the article hereI think after consulting it you will come to agree with the author’s perspective that the ox was loaned or rented to the man to process grain, and as it was another man’s property he should not abuse it for his own gain. Paul is saying that he and other elders like him are the, “oxen of the Lord” if you will, and they should not be mistreated. With other men’s works, and commentaries, it is important to examine them carefully. Their interpretation may not be the best one. Examine their reasoning, and the context of their arguments and conclusions to see what you think is the truest. I happen to agree with Justin Taylor. I think in context to the entirety of scripture, and what we know from it about the created order this explanation makes the most sense.

You’ll notice this time we used a text with a quote from the Old Testament. It was from one of the Pastoral Epistles, but due to the quote we had to look at the broader context of scripture and examine 1 Corinthians, as well as Deuteronomy. The main text we were exegeting is prescriptive/instructional. You’ll also notice that we were doing a Bible study, but hopefully you could see that the same process would be used for a topical study, or a word study.

With a word study you would want to use a concordance and see how many different Greek, and Hebrew words were translated as the English word you are using, and how many times the specific word you are studying was used in the Bible, and what it meant most of those times, being careful to employ the hermeneutical principles mentioned earlier to determine what the intent of the author was to communicate.

I hope that this brief primer on how to study the Bible was helpful, and easy to follow. The word of God is our food. It is the mind of God for us to know Him by. It is how the sovereign God chose to explain Himself to us. It is entirely about Him. We can see Jesus in every book and chapter. We can preach the gospel of Christ out of every book. He is the central theme, not us. God bless you in your efforts to know Him better by His word.

“Methodist Pastor Uses Bible Verse to Defend Forcing Christians to Fund Abortions” Original article is from LifeNews.com

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As the title suggests, this Free Methodist, female, “Pastor” has twisted the very words of Jesus, to justify her pro-abortion stance. Here is what she had to say,

Jesus directs us to advocate for a just society that allows people to live their lives to the fullest. Jesus directs us to advocate for a just society that allows people to live their lives to the fullest. In John 10:10, Jesus says, ‘I have come that you might have life, and have it to the full,’ Baker said. “And this means supporting access to affordable birth control, because by permitting individuals to plan if, whether and when to become pregnant, birth control allows us to live our fullest lives.” You can read the full article on LifeNews.com

You might ask, “How someone could twist God’s word to justify such evil?” Well it starts with liberal theology. You might ask, “What is liberal theology?”

Here is a quote from GotQuestions.org answering that question;

Answer: In liberal Christian teaching, which is not Christian at all, man’s reason is stressed and is treated as the final authority. Liberal theologians seek to reconcile Christianity with secular science and modern thinking. In doing so, they treat science as all-knowing and the Bible as fable-laden and false. Genesis’ early chapters are reduced to poetry or fantasy, having a message, but not to be taken literally (in spite of Jesus’ having spoken of those early chapters in literal terms). Mankind is not seen as totally depraved, and thus liberal theologians have an optimistic view of the future of mankind. The social gospel is also emphasized, while the inability of fallen man to fulfill it is denied. Whether a person is saved from his sin and its penalty in hell is no longer the issue; the main thing is how man treats his fellow man. “Love” of our fellow man becomes the defining issue. As a result of this “reasoning” by liberal theologians, the following doctrines are taught by liberal quasi-Christian theologians:

1) The Bible is not “God-breathed” and has errors. Because of this belief, man (the liberal theologians) must determine which teachings are correct and which are not. Belief that the Bible is “inspired” (in that word’s original meaning) by God is only held by simpletons. This directly contradicts 2 Timothy 3:16-17: “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.”

2) The virgin birth of Christ is a mythological false teaching. This directly contradicts Isaiah 7:14 and Luke 2.

3) Jesus did not rise again from the grave in bodily form. This contradicts the resurrection accounts in all four Gospels and the entire New Testament.

4) Jesus was a good moral teacher, but His followers and their followers have taken liberties with the history of His life (there were no “supernatural” miracles), with the Gospels having been written many years later and merely ascribed to the early disciples in order to give greater weight to their teachings. This contradicts the 2 Timothy passage and the doctrine of the supernatural preservation of the Scriptures by God. 

5) Hell is not real. Man is not lost in sin and is not doomed to some future judgment without a relationship with Christ through faith. Man can help himself; no sacrificial death by Christ is necessary since a loving God would not send people to such a place as hell and since man is not born in sin. This contradicts Jesus Himself, who declared Himself to be the Way to God, through His atoning death (John 14:6). 

6) Most of the human authors of the Bible are not who they are traditionally believed to be. For instance, they believe that Moses did not write the first five books of the Bible. The book of Daniel had two authors because there is no way that the detailed “prophecies” of the later chapters could have been known ahead of time; they must have been written after the fact. The same thinking is carried over to the New Testament books. These ideas contradict not only the Scriptures but historical documents which verify the existence of all the people whom the liberals deny.

7) The most important thing for man to do is to “love” his neighbor. What is the loving thing to do in any situation is not what the Bible says is good but what the liberal theologians decide is good. This denies the doctrine of total depravity, which states that man is incapable of doing anything good and loving (Jeremiah 17:9) until He has been redeemed by Christ and given a new nature (2 Corinthians 5:17). 

There are many pronouncements of Scripture against those who would deny the deity of Christ (2 Peter 2:1)—which liberal Christianity does. Scripture also denounces those who would preach a different gospel from what was preached by the apostles (Galatians 1:8)—which is what the liberal theologians do in denying the necessity of Christ’s atoning death and preaching a social gospel in its place. The Bible condemns those who call good evil and evil good (Isaiah 5:20)—which some liberal churches do by embracing homosexuality as an alternative lifestyle while the Bible repeatedly condemns its practice.

Scripture speaks against those who would cry “peace, peace” when there is no peace (Jeremiah 6:14)—which liberal theologians do by saying that man can attain peace with God apart from Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and that man need not worry about a future judgment before God. The Word of God speaks of a time when men will have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (2 Timothy 3:5)—which is what liberal theology does in that it says that there is some inner goodness in man that does not require a rebirth by the Holy Spirit through faith in Christ. And it speaks against those who would serve idols instead of the one true God (1 Chronicles 16:26)—which liberal Christianity does in that it creates a false god according to its own liking rather than worshiping God as He is described in the whole of the Bible

You can see that it boils down to a belief in man’s reason, and his culture, over the Bible. If you’ve ever wondered how people ignore scripture verses like;

2 Timothy 3:16-17 (NASB Strong’s)  All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.

1 Timothy 2:12-15 (NASB Strong’s)  But I do not allow a woman to teach or exercise authority over a man, but to remain quiet.  For it was Adam who was first created, and then Eve. And it was not Adam who was deceived, but the woman being deceived, fell into transgression. But women will be preserved through the bearing of children if they continue in faith and love and sanctity with self-restraint.

Titus 1:5-9 (NASB Strong’s) For this reason I left you in Crete, that you would set in order what remains and appoint elders in every city as I directed you, namely, if any man is above reproach, the husband of one wife, having children who believe, not accused of dissipation or rebellion. For the  overseer must be above reproach as God’s steward, not self-willed, not quick-tempered, not addicted to wine, not pugnacious, not fond of sordid gain, but hospitable, loving what is good, sensible, just, devout, self-controlled,  holding fast the faithful word which is in accordance with the teaching, so that he will be able both to exhort in sound doctrine and to refute those who contradict.

Now you have your answer. They ignore these verses because they interpret them through their modern liberal theological hermeneutic which denies the accuracy, and authority of Scripture.

The Free Methodists have been in trouble for a long time. They are almost as liberal as the Episcopalians. One of the first things that happens when a denomination starts down the road of liberal theology is that they start ordaining women as elders/pastors. When you see that happening, you know they have put their feet on the other side of the slippery slope. Satan’s lies haven’t changed over the years. He tells us to not believe God’s words, and that we can be like God. We can live how we want to live. Don’t believe people who claim to be Christian, and are also pro-abortion, because chances are, they are not Christian at all, but self-deceived dupes of the devil.

When Jesus, God incarnate, the eternal Son, the second Person of the Triune God said in John 10:7-10 (NASB) “So Jesus said to them again, “Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep. All who came before Me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not hear them. I am the door; if anyone enters through Me, he will be saved, and will go in and out and find pasture. The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.”

Does it look at all like He was trying to justify having a convenient, child-free life, of sexual immorality, and infanticide? Nope! In context, it looks like He is saying that in Him you can actually have true life. You can be forgiven of your sins, granted true repentance and faith, be born again spiritually, and live for all eternity with Him. Not only that, but while you are here on this Earth, living your life, you can do it for the glory of God, and be free from the bondage of sin! That isn’t a license to go and murder babies. It isn’t permission to do whatever your evil little unregenerate hearts want to do as false converts! Eternal life, in Christ our Savior, and Lord, free from sins bondage, is what Jesus is talking about. He is not talking about the one command of the satan worshipers, “Do as thou will.”

A Snyder’s Soapbox Review of, “When my Ox Gores my Neighbor: Using Hermeneutics to Travel from Mt. Sinai to Mt. Zion” by Josiah Nichols.

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I was contacted by a mutual friend to do this review. Up until that point I had not heard of Josiah Nichols. This would be the first work that I have read of his. It might also be his first published work. It isn’t a long book, nor is it a book that requires a seminary education to read. The author’s purpose is to demonstrate how he employs hermeneutics to interpret, and derive applications from Exodus 21:28-32. The book is very evangelistic. I would say that it has been far more evangelistic than many theological books that I’ve recently read.

From reading the title, and the author’s intended goal treating the topic of hermeneutics, I expected a more in depth primer on hermeneutics, and a demonstration of the analytical methods of hermeneutics on the cited verses. While the author accomplished this goal, I think occasionally the author also got a little lost in some peripheral details.

It is also evident that the author is a big fan of Wretched Radio/TV and their work. Todd Friel is the host of the programs as well as the podcast. The people over there at Wretched have put out a number of very useful videos, and educational products. Josiah refers to, “Hermen Who?” numerous times throughout the book. Wretched should thank him for the plug 🙂 I liked both the book, and Wretched. I am a big fan of their work to, so I share that with the author.

The questions I consider for book purchases are, is it theologically accurate, and will it add value to the individual’s Christian library? That’s it. That’s how simple it is for me to decide, “yes” or “no” for a book. The answer to the first question is, yes this book is good and accurate if you are Reformed in your soteriology. If you are not, it is still accurate, and you are the one with the problem lol.  As far as value goes, it does add value to your library as a resource to loan out. This book is evangelistic. I would feel good handing this to someone who is new in the faith. It will teach them a bit about hermeneutics, and much more about other doctrines of God.

After reading it, I am still hard pressed to categorize this book, or write a more fitting title. The author does analyze Exodus 21:28-32. He does so accurately. He did not twist the scripture, or impose a meaning on it that was not intended by the author of scripture. It would be educational for a new Christian. I believe that was his intended audience. I look forward to seeing Josiah’s future projects. I think we will see bigger and better works from him. He was precise and nuanced without being rhetorical. Some theological books for laymen seem as if the authors had forgotten who their audience was. If Josiah reads this, “Keep up the good work.” You can pick up a copy of his book at Amazon, Christianbook, or Westbow to name a few. It can be purchased from many other online book retail sites.

ISBN-13: 978-1512782530